In selling directing through distributors and collaborate with installers and contributors for project service distribution, putting a system engagement employee it’s a solution that allows you to access information and make it available to your organisation. An article from Harvart Business Reviews with the headline “The Digital Transformation of Business”, where they surveyed 537 of their customers that were asked about the most important place where they can begin in making investment, and there answer is in customer facing technology.
Although the four “megatrends” of cloud, big data, mobile and social technologies are clearly having a positive impact, industry watchers who believe that only a few early adopters have been able to transform their organizations with these technologies are mistaken.
Digital transformation is occurring rapidly at a majority of public and private sector organizations. Business leaders are not simply deploying the four technologies to boost efficiency or otherwise cut costs. Instead, research shows that firms are embracing the megatrends to craft new business models, develop new revenue streams, or drive other material changes that lead to an increase in the top or bottom lines.

It’s a full-fledged mobile sales terminal for the whole customer experience,”

says Greenbaum.

Eventually, the mobile devices—together with a growing number of in-seat flat screen TVs—will enable Delta to sell higher-value seats, book new flights, reserve hotel rooms, or rent cars while in flight, delivering new services and new sources of revenue. In addition, the airline says it will eventually provide flight attendants with customer-specific information from Delta’s customer relationship management (CRM) system on their mobile devices to enable more personalized service. “That’s pretty transformational,” says Greenbaum.
The widespread use of mobile technologies is also having an impact on the public sector. For example, the Metropolitan Police in the United Kingdom wanted to dramatically improve the way suspects brought into the police station were processed. Aside from the fact that the suspects weren’t always cooperative, the technology used to capture photos of the suspects was aging, and image capture had to be performed in a fixed manner by trained specialists in a specified location. At the end of the day “it was a cumbersome and difficult process,” says Richard Thwaite, chief information officer of the Metropolitan Police.
MOBILE CONNECTS EMPLOYEES TO THEIR WORK AND EACH OTHER
Benefits of using mobile devices and applications
To improve its booking process, the agency deployed tablets with specialized mobile applications to police officers so they themselves could capture multiple images and video clips of the suspects, including tattoos or clothing, in a less confrontational manner, and enter it into their systems quickly. Other innovations the Metropolitan Police is pursuing include cameras on officers and a text messaging service to reduce emergency calls.

We are going to use technology to stop crime, arrest offenders, or help victims. We need to keep police officers out of police stations and reduce bureaucracy,”

says Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. “Digital policing will help us to do this.” Similarly, the growing ubiquity of mobile technologies is having a transformative impact by helping to deliver healthcare services to underserved populations. None quarter of all stillborn births happen in India—600,000 a year in that country alone—largely because so many expectant mothers live too far away from sources of good maternal and obstetric care. Wipro, a system integration services company, looked at the inefficiencies in delivery of medical care to these women in India and decided that there were several areas where technology could dramatically improve the process. Last year, Wipro unveiled a system that enabled healthcare providers to deliver remote prenatal and cardiac care using mobile technologies. The AssureHealth platform combines a mobile application, integrated medical devices, analytics, and cloud services. A wireless monitor records heart rates or uterine activity and delivers the information via Bluetooth to the mobile device. The device sends the data to the cloud, where it is analyzed, and a doctor hundreds of miles away can download the results and provide an assessment in real time. In areas of India where health services aren’t readily available, explains T.K. Padmanabha, CTO of Wipro, “what is available is the phone.” With regard to the risks involved in deploying mobile technologies, the survey found that data security far outpaces other concerns.
Survey respondents who said mobile technologies are a critical part of their infrastructure are also likely to name data security as their number one worry. “Employees have access to your data on a device they can—and will—lose,”says David Chappell, principal with technology consultancy Chappell & Associates. The portability of data and apps, plus the use of personal devices, raises red flags.
SECURITY RISKS ARE RELATIVE
Data security ranks as an important risk, especially for mobile and cloud
Security is an important concern with all four of the megatrends. When it comes to the public cloud, for example, security is “a trust issue,” says Chappell.
“And it takes time to build that trust.”
Greenbaum notes that executives are more aware of security issues these days because of recent events, including revelations about the U.S. government’s National Security Agency (NSA) snooping, massive data breaches at Target and other retailers, and the Heartbleed bug that exposed vulnerabilities in a widely used web security protocol.
Leading companies are dealing with the security risks associated with the widespread adoption of mobile technologies by developing sound BYOD strategies.
They are adopting device encryption and two-factor authentication, as well as using Mobile Device Management (MDM) solutions to wipe out corporate data on devices if they are lost or stolen.
CLOUD COMPUTING DRIVES BUSINESS AGILITY
According to the study, 53 percent of respondents said that the cloud’s ability to deliver flexible capacity as needed is the technology’s leading benefit, followed by 50 percent of respondents who said that increased business agility was its main benefit. Forty-three percent pointed to lower fixed costs from using cloud-based solutions as its key benefit. Going forward, cloud computing is primed to have a powerful impact on businesses in 2015. More than three-fifths (62 percent) of respondents say cloud will transform their businesses in the next 12 months, up from 47 percent who say it’s doing so today. It will also change the way people work, according to 56 percent of those surveyed. While cloud technologies have clearly had an impact on IT departments, companies are doing more with them than revamping IT operations.

We’re beyond the first generation of cloud transformation, which was just facilitating the move from capital to operating expense. Now we’re looking at ways in which we can more easily enable collaboration and deploy services in elastic fashion,”

offers Greenbaum.
CLOUD MAKES BUSINESS FLEXIBLE AND COST EFFECTIVE
Benefits of cloud computing
Companies need to be agile, flexible, and fast to meet customer expectations. Cloud computing can be key to that responsiveness.“We have customers who give us 90 days to get something up and running,” observes Padmanabha of Wipro. “There’s no way I can do that in my traditional data center.” The public cloud delivers a time-to-market advantage that’s hard for enterprises to beat.

“We see a lot of traction with customers who have projects that have a short window of time to deliver results,”

Padmanabha says.
Wu Feng, a professor of computer science, electrical & computer engineering, and health sciences at Virginia Tech, concurs that the flexible capacity of cloud-based solutions can enable dramatic increases in performance that weren’t available previously. Next-generation sequencers are capable of doubling the amount of data that they generate every eight or nine months. “We’re generating data faster than we can analyze it,” Feng says. A cloud solution, which optimizes data management and data transfer, delivers better performance and access to DNA sequencing tools and resources, leading to faster advancements in medical research. As with mobile, security issues and privacy concerns are the main barriers that inhibit cloud adoption.

“I’m in a highly regulated business. Beyond that, I’m in a consumer-facing business where I’m accountable for the stewardship of personally identifiable customer data,”

says Ray Voelker, CIO of Progressive Insurance. Because encrypting data in the cloud would slow down the speed of analytics, Voelker says he’s evaluating hybrid cloud solutions. “Most companies look at a hybrid environment,” says Greenbaum.

“They don’t do everything in the cloud. But as new services and capabilities and opportunities come up, they look to do that via cloud services.”

Despite some hesitation, the study identified strong support for cloud-based solutions as more than just a way to reduce IT infrastructure and personnel spending. The study found that leading companies are using the rise of public and private cloud computing to create new business models and services in addition to taking advantage of the greater cost efficiencies and scalability features that the cloud provides.
BIG DATA HELPS COMPANIES INNOVATE
The advent of new data analysis solutions such as in-memory computing, along with the ability to host many of these solutions in the cloud, is enabling enterprises to overcome the traditional barriers to big data analysis. Organizations today have the ability to process and analyze large quantities of structured and unstructured data to generate business insight in real time. With the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT)—including wearable computing, connected cars, and smart cities—the amount of data organizations have available to analyze is set to increase exponentially.
Even now, just over half (54 percent) of respondents say that big data has transformed their organizations; 70 percent expect it to do so going forward. For those who master big data, the biggest payoffs are allowing the integration of more data into decision making processes (according to 62 percent) and enabling faster generation of insights (cited by 52 percent).
Progressive has collected more than 178 terabytes of data via Snapshot—11 times the amount of all data stored by the Library of Congress. It provides for a much more accurate pricing method for Progressive than estimating a customer’s potential for loss based on information like age, gender, and type of car, says Voelker. What’s more, it has enabled an entirely new and successful product category—usage-based auto insurance. “It’s revolutionary to us,” says Voelker.

Every time we find a more powerful segmentation variable, it drives more growth.”

Another example of a leading organization using big data to innovate comes from Auckland Transport, New Zealand’s public transport agency.
The agency analyzes four terabytes of operational data, including bus ridership, to discover the most popular routes, identify routes to expand, and improve the customer experience. “It’s a substantial undertaking,” says Roger Jones, Auckland Transport’s manager of IT and business systems.

We have to figure out how to transform that data to information and then make that information relevant to the customer.”

In the future, Auckland Transport plans to analyze images from around the city to understand where traffic congestion occurs or to assist with public safety. Ultimately, the agency will deliver personalized alerts to citizens letting them know their bus is running late or that there’s increased traffic on their usual route to work.
Despite the promise of big data, however, it remains hard to manage, hard to interpret, and hard to integrate into day-to-day business operations and decision making. Further, success doesn’t happen overnight. “The companies that are good at [big data] have been working on it for quite a while,” says Thomas H. Davenport, professor of IT and Management at Babson College and author of Big Data @ Work. Davenport points out that one of the earliest users of business analytics—UPS—has been working on telematics to track its packages and delivery trucks for 25 years but only recently announced plans for analytics-based dynamic routing (itself a project 10 years in development). Further, skilled data analysts and scientists, who understand both the statistical modeling and the business applications of big data, are hard to find.
Nearly half of respondents (48 percent) say that a lack of data analysis skills is the biggest barrier to big data. Even those who regard big data as a critical part of their operations find it difficult to hire the necessary talent. Leading companies are addressing this talent shortage by hiring skilled contractors or working with consulting firms that have big data practices.
Some are getting more creative. Jones, at Auckland Transport, is addressing the talent shortage by working with data scientists at local universities. There’s a wealth of opportunity for PhDs who might unearth something interesting mixing our data sets with other data sets,” he explains.The department is also sponsoring a hackathon.

It’s about exposing some of our data feeds so others can analyze it in ways we might not be able to internally.”
Further, the study results highlight that successful organizations are those that adopt a big data mind-set. Business leaders must create a culture that embraces the intelligence big data delivers, agrees Donald A. Marchand, professor of strategy execution and information management at the International Institute for Management Development (IMD). “
You have to treat bad news as good news and be willing to act on it,” he says. “You need the ability to see that the way you thought about things in the past may not be productive in the future.” And this point of view has to be pervasive—from the C-suite to sales and product development to the front lines.
SOCIAL TRANSFORMS CORE BUSINESS PROCESSES
According to the survey, the consulting and business services sector is the most transformed by social media—more than half of that sector’s respondents indicated that they had already experienced a transformational effect from social. Early business successes with social networking are most visible in outbound marketing activities: 51 percent of respondents say that social media has increased their company’s ability to effectively communicate with its customers.
THE DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION OF BUSINESS
Industry experts observe that social media is becoming a core aspect of modern digital marketing strategies, and they see potential for it to radically transform the marketing function. But forward-thinking organizations are not using social networks only to listen to and better understand customer sentiment about products, brands, and companies as a whole. They are also using social technologies for recruiting and HR management, and for collaboration and communication with employees, partners and suppliers. The survey findings indicate that social technology is positioned to have a broad impact. Survey respondents who deem social technology to be critical to their infrastructure (22 percent) are significantly more likely than their peers to say they benefit from an increased ability to innovate.
Even businesses that haven’t yet embraced social media anticipate its potential. More than half of all respondents say that social technology will transform their organizations (57 percent) and the way they work (58 percent) in the next few years.
Four years ago, Ask.com, a leading online brand for questions and answers, hired Eric McKirdy to improve the customer support experience and improve the support team’s internal operations. By deploying a CRM application that integrates mobile social media listening capabilities, the company has transformed both. One key change in how Ask.com’s customer support team works is that they can now manage support tickets, including those generated through social media, entirely by smartphone, without being tethered to a laptop or an office.
Similarly, Auckland Transport is evaluating social tools to listen and respond quickly to citizen comments and even prevent security dangers. The agency plans to mine that unstructured data, analyze it, and feed it to the operations team to respond to—and someday prevent— transportation problems. Like Ask.com, Auckland Transport eventually plans to create service requests from complaints posted on social networks, feed them into a CRM system, and manage them proactively. Business leaders note, however, that it isn’t always clear how best to incorporate social media into core business operations.
Social technologies are often not integrated with core operational systems, and the data they generate is unstructured.

As far as enabling line of business transactions and being used beyond boosting marketing and the employment brand,” says Progressive Insurance’s Voelker, “it’s less mature as a business tool.”
The main concerns survey respondents have about social technology include the time spent by employees using it (cited by 45 percent) and employee information overload (cited by 40 percent). But leading companies are using social in their core lines of business, turning to social tools that provide a greater level of integration with their mission critical business systems. For example, McKirdy of Ask.com said the company once used a variety of social media monitoring and communication tools to identify and respond to issues. But now that Ask.com uses one social module in a cloud-based CRM system, “We monitor all major social media channels and can respond with the click of a mouse,” says McKirdy.
HOW DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION HAPPENS
While it is clear that each of the four technology megatrends has had a tremendous impact independently, the study finds that deploying integrated solutions is where the greatest impact is achieved. “The most important trends, the most interesting things, are happening at the intersections of these four different technologies,” asserts Babson College’s Davenport. Similarly, Horrom, of the Detroit Lions, says,

There’s less value to the Lions in having big data coming in if we don’t have a method of compute in the cloud or on premises to interact in real time with our fans via a mobile platform.”

The survey found the likelihood that organizations are being transformed to be significantly greater among those that deem multiple technologies to be critical. Among “multi-adopters”— organizations that view at least three of the megatrends as playing a critical role in operations— more than two-thirds (67 percent) report they have transformed, compared to as few as onethird (34 percent) of single adopters. Even dual-adopters (using two technologies in critical areas) are better poised to reap the benefits that sit at the nexus of these technology trends.
Most importantly, the innovation and improved agility described in the examples above are not simply a result of spending more on IT. At this point in cloud, mobile, social media, and analytics development, C-level and senior line of business executives should be assessing the various business capabilities of their organizations and developing a strategy and a road map to improve and differentiate their core capabilities with these digital technologies. The firms that take advantage of the new capabilities can not only transform themselves but also achieve success in the 21st century.

None of the changes enabled by these technologies comes without accompanying organizational changes—management mind-sets, organizational behavior, operating cultures,”

says Marchand of IMD. Deep change over time coupled with these technologies is where transformation happens.”


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